How to prevent and treat children’s sports injuries

Saturday mornings spent on a football field, or after-school gymnastic or swimming lessons are an important rite of passage in most kids’ childhoods – and for good reason.

While we know the health benefits of regular exercise, the ever-present risk of injury can be a dampener for parents. However, there are a few simple things every parent can do to reduce risks – as well as things every parent should know in case injury does strike.

Preventing injury:

Doing what you can to prevent injury on the sporting field involves both a bit of preparation and a bit of vigilance. Here are a few things you can do:

  • Make sure your child is wearing the correct safety gear for the sport they’re playing. Helmets, mouth guards, shin pads, wrist guards and so on all have a role to play, depending on the sport. Your child’s coach should be able to provide a list of the correct equipment.
  • Ensure your child stays hydrated. Kids can become so caught up in the moment they forget to stop and replenish, so encourage them to do so.
  • Know what a concussion looks like. We’ve outlined the symptoms further in this article.
  • Don’t be afraid to speak up if you have concerns over the conditions your child is playing in. If you think it’s too hot for a scheduled game of cricket or too cold for swimming outdoors, then trust your gut.
  • Make sure your child is correctly undertaking any warm-up and cool-down exercises. If none have been set, encourage them to do some gentle running and plenty of stretching before playing sport. Cool-down exercises should involve further stretching.

Be prepared:

You’re making sure your child is prepared, so it pays for you to be as well. Here’s a few steps you can take:

  • Make sure you’re up to date with your first aid training.
  • Keep a first aid kit handy in your car.
  • Keep a phone on you, or close to hand.

Know how to treat common injuries:

Sprains: Sprains are best treated using the RICE approach: rest, ice, compression and elevation.

Cuts: Stop the bleeding by applying direct pressure on the area, gently clean the wound, and wrap in a sterile bandage.

Grazes: Clean the wound with water. Pat the area dry and apply a sterile plaster or dressing.

Bleeding nose: Encourage your child to sit up, leaning slightly forward. Apply an ice pack to the injured area.

Concussion: Some tell-tale signs your child might be concussed are if he or she is complaining of a headache or feeling pressure in the head, has lost consciousness, is behaving confused, seeing stars or has become dizzy.  If you suspect your child may have concussion, seed medical help as soon as possible.

Remember, a few bumps and bruises are part and parcel of playing sports – but with a bit of vigilance, you can ensure your child’s best sporting tales are all ones of glory, not injury.

Seeing Your Child In An Emergency Can Be Horrifying – Feeling Helpless is Worse

With the help of our training, you’ll sleep easy knowing that you’re prepared for almost every emergency.

  • If your child is burnt or scalded, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child eats something and starts choking, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child experiences a sudden seizure, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child has been underwater and drowning, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child is suffering from a super-high fever, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child suffers a severe allergic reaction, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child swallows poison or a household substance, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child has an accident and breaks a bone, you’ll be prepared.

For the Price of a Restaurant Dinner, You Can Know PRECISELY How to Deal with Your Child’s Emergency…

Our most popular course is the Kids FIRST Aid — 3 Hour Course

This engaging and practical course covers the 10 most common emergency situations. At the end of 3 hours, you’ll know precisely how to deal with the emergency situation before the paramedics and first responders arrive. You’ll also receive a take home poster to remind you of the correct techniques.

Your entire workshop tuition is just AU$ 85 per person (including GST). A nominal sum to ensure you’re equipped to respond to a first aid emergency, whenever the need arises.

Unlike many other first aid courses, ALL our workshops are delivered by qualified and experienced paramedics – many of whom are parents themselves.

Treating bites and cuts on your child’s lip or tongue

Any parent who’s cared for a child after an injury to the tongue or lip can testify that it can be a confronting experience for everyone involved.

Injuries to the lip and tongue tend to be common, occurring often during playground knocks and falls, through sporting activity, or just general childhood play.

They can also be quite dramatic, with a tendency to bleed and swell more than other injuries, thanks to the high degree of blood flow to the area.

The good news is that blood flow tends to mean they typically heal quickly, too. That said, there are things you can do to help – as well as things you need to keep an eye on

When you find a cut on your child’s lip or tongue

One of the challenges of assessing any damage to the lip or tongue after a cut or bite can be bleeding from the injury. It’s important to reassure your child as much as possible so that they stay calm.

  1. Apply clean cloth or bandage to slow blood flow
    If excess bleeding is a problem, apply a clean piece of cloth gently to the area to help slow down the flow of blood. Apply pressure for at least five minutes.
  1. Apply a cold compress
    Tongue and lip injuries can swell quickly, so it’s important to do what you can to reduce swelling in the area. Gently applying a cold compress will help. An icy pole can help reduce tongue swelling.
  2. Clean the wound
    As soon as possible, gently clean the wound. Our mouths are full of bacteria, so it’s important to keep the area as clean as possible to avoid infection. Gently remove any dirt or gravel from the area.

How should you help the healing process?

There are a few steps you can take to ensure the wound heals quickly and without scarring.

  • Keep the wound clean and dry.
  • Avoid feeding your child any food likely to aggravate the wound, including anything spicy.
  • Check the area every day for any signs it’s not healing properly.
  • Use a sunscreen on the area after it heals to prevent scarring.

When should you see a doctor?

You should take your child to a healthcare professional if bleeding persists after applying pressure to the area for five minutes.

Wounds that cross from the lip area into the cheek may require further treatment to heal properly, so should also be taken for assessment.

You should also call the doctor if:

  • The cut looks deep, as it may require stitches
  • The wound is embedded with dirt or gravel or needs extra cleaning
  • The tongue is punctured

Keep a close eye on the injury for signs of infection. Any infection will usually occur about four days after the injury itself. Look for tell-tale signs including fever, swelling, pus, redness or any signs that the injury is worsening rather than healing.

Seeing Your Child In An Emergency Can Be Horrifying – Feeling Helpless is Worse

With the help of our training, you’ll sleep easy knowing that you’re prepared for almost every emergency.

  • If your child is burnt or scalded, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child eats something and starts choking, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child experiences a sudden seizure, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child has been underwater and drowning, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child is suffering from a super-high fever, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child suffers a severe allergic reaction, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child swallows poison or a household substance, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child has an accident and breaks a bone, you’ll be prepared.

For the Price of a Restaurant Dinner, You Can Know PRECISELY How to Deal with Your Child’s Emergency…

Our most popular course is the Kids FIRST Aid — 3 Hour Course

This engaging and practical course covers the 10 most common emergency situations. At the end of 3 hours, you’ll know precisely how to deal with the emergency situation before the paramedics and first responders arrive. You’ll also receive a take home poster to remind you of the correct techniques.

Your entire workshop tuition is just AU$ 85 per person (including GST). A nominal sum to ensure you’re equipped to respond to a first aid emergency, whenever the need arises.

Unlike many other first aid courses, ALL our workshops are delivered by qualified and experienced paramedics – many of whom are parents themselves.

“Top Ten Most Popular” Kids First Aid Blog Articles – 2017 Edition

Every month we publish a blog article that explains what to do if a child or baby is experiencing a unique scenario that may require first aid. Here are the top ten most popular post on our blog, ranked in order.

These articles are essential reading for all parents and carers.

One: Parent’s Guide To Treating Grazes

If there are three things that are certain in life they are death, taxes, and grazes on children’s knees and elbows. In this article you’ll learn how to treat a graze as soon as it happens, and you’ll also know what to do if a graze becomes infected. Read here.

 

Two: Should I Take My Toddler To Hospital After A Bang On The Head?

One of the most worrying things to see on a young child is a rapid swelling of the head after a fall or bang. In this article, you’ll learn:

  1. The difference between minor and serious head injuries
  2. Treating minor head injuries
  3. Treating more serious head injuries

 

Three: Should You Let Your Child Sleep After A Fall?

Children fall over all the time; often during their toddler years and in the playground at school. But a serious accident, where the child hurts their head, can be a real cause for concern. In this article you’ll learn the three steps to safety, after your child takes a fall. Read here.

 

Four: How to Treat Children for Bee and Wasp Stings

For a child, a sting can be a big deal; especially when stung for the first time. In this article you’ll learn the difference between wasps and bees, and how to treat each sting type accordingly. Read here.

 

Five: What to do if your baby has swallowed something

Babies learn about the world quickly, and in several different ways. One of their key learning mechanisms is by putting things in their mouths – taste and touch working in tandem. But every now and then, a baby will swallow whatever it is they are trying to learn about: and that can have disastrous effects. In this article you’ll learn how to respond if you suspect your baby has swallowed something. Read here.

 

Six: Dealing with Accidental Amputations

Accidental amputation of limbs can happen at any time and any place, and young children’s delicate limbs are most at risk. In this article, you’ll learn about:

  1. Treating an amputated limb
  2. Preserving the severed limb
  3. Avoid the #1 common mistake that can have disastrous effects

 

Seven: What To Do If You Think Your Child Has Fractured A Bone

When a child does fracture a bone, there is likely to be a lot of pain, probably tears and shock. In this article you’ll learn the action steps you should take if your child has fractured or broken a bone. Read here.

 

Eight: Spotting and Treating an Allergic Reaction

Knowing the signs of allergy – and how to treat a child suffering an allergic reaction – is a vital skill for a parent. In this article you’ll learn:

  1. What is an allergy?
  2. Signs of an allergic reaction
  3. What to do

 

Nine: What to do when a Child Puts Something up Their Nose

It’s inevitable — there comes a time when almost every child shoves something up their nose. In this article, you’ll learn a clever way of dislodging a foreign object stuck in a nasal passage. Read here.

 

Ten: Parent’s Guide: How to treat a Jellyfish Sting

One of our country’s greatest pleasures is to enjoy a hot summer’s day swimming with our kids at the beach. Unfortunately, there are a few hidden dangers lurking in the water that can spoil your fun, particularly for your children. One of the more common dangers is a sting from a Jellyfish. This article explains a seven-step treatment method for Jellyfish stings. Read here.

Seeing Your Child In An Emergency Can Be Horrifying – Feeling Helpless is Worse

With the help of our training, you’ll sleep easy knowing that you’re prepared for almost every emergency.

  • If your child is burnt or scalded, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child eats something and starts choking, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child experiences a sudden seizure, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child has been underwater and drowning, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child is suffering from a super-high fever, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child suffers a severe allergic reaction, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child swallows poison or a household substance, you’ll be prepared.
  • If your child has an accident and breaks a bone, you’ll be prepared.

For the Price of a Restaurant Dinner, You Can Know PRECISELY How to Deal with Your Child’s Emergency…

Our most popular course is the Kids FIRST Aid — 3 Hour Course

This engaging and practical course covers the 10 most common emergency situations. At the end of 3 hours, you’ll know precisely how to deal with the emergency situation before the paramedics and first responders arrive. You’ll also receive a take home poster to remind you of the correct techniques.

Your entire workshop tuition is just AU$ 85 per person (including GST). A nominal sum to ensure you’re equipped to respond to a first aid emergency, whenever the need arises.

Unlike many other first aid courses, ALL our workshops are delivered by qualified and experienced paramedics – many of whom are parents themselves.

How do you know if your baby has been poisioned?

The most common poisons relating to babies and children are items commonly found around the household like:

  • Alcohol
  • Cleaners
  • Bleaches
  • Medications

How signs of poisoning present

Most poisons present with one or two typical symptoms. The most common is nausea and vomiting.

Vomiting occurs because the baby understands very quickly that the substance they’ve just eaten or drunk is no good for them, and their brain (in defence mode) says let’s get rid of it… and so they vomit it up.

The other most common thing to identify a poisoning incident is an empty container or packaging. If your child has ingested something poisonous, say they’ve drunk weed killer in the garage, quite often they’ll have the empty bottle, or half empty bottle of weed killer lying next to them spilled on the ground.

Sometimes, children can even bring the container to you, and they see it as a trophy, so for instance toddlers quite often might go into a bedside drawer, they find medication, and they think they are lollies.

They eat all the stuff out of the medicine packaging, and then when they’ve got the empty packaging, they can actually go to you – Mum and Dad, Grandma and Grandad, and hold it up and be quite proud that they’ve just eaten this stuff that’s not that good for them.

But because there’s literally thousands of different types of poisons out there, there’s literally that many different ways that they can present.

They could cause tummy aches, they could cause burns, they could cause swelling, redness, but typically were looking at vomiting, and we also want to find this container that they’ve used.

What we need to do if your child has been poisoned, is make a phone call. And for once, this time, it’s not 000. This time you need to ring the Poisons Information Line.

The Poisons Information Line is a great service that works 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Have that empty container or packaging with you. And while you’re talking to the operator, tell them what your child has just had – and however much is missing from the container of the product that you can read on the label.

The operator on 13 11 26 will then give you advice specifically relating to the poison that your child’s ingested. They can also organise an ambulance to come to you while they’re giving you advice.

These people will be able to tell you specifically what you need to do, relating to what the poison does to your child. So that might mean they might get your child to drink water, it might be not to drink water, they’ll give you the advice specifically that you require.

That number again is 13 11 26 for the Poisons Information Line. Save it in your phone under P for Poison so you’ve always got it available. If you want to learn more about poisons and how to treat poisons in the home come along to a Kids First Aid course.

Free DRSABC First Aid Poster

Here’s another potentially lifesaving resource for you and your family – put together by our team of trained paramedics.

Click HERE to get your copy of the Dr’s ABC poster for FREE

It’s a first aid poster focused on the simple process for handling any emergency situation confidently and calmly.

The six step process is called D.R.S.A.B.C. or Dr’s ABC – a short but powerful acronym designed to help you:

  • Identify immediate risks to you and the patient (D is for Danger)
  • Quickly assess the extent of their injuries (R is for Response)
  • Call for expert medical support (S is for Send for Help)
  • Ensure the patient’s airway is not blocked (A is for Airway)
  • Check the patient is breathing (B is for Breathing)
  • Administer CPR if necessary (C is for CPR)

The poster is yours free for you to print out and display in your home and office.

Click HERE to get your copy of the Dr’s ABC poster for FREE

So go ahead, download the poster and share it with your friends using the buttons below – I’m sure they’ll thank you for it!

Four Parenting Surprises You Won’t Understand Until You’re a Parent

Mother and childEveryone knows that when you have a baby, you’re going to be exhausted!  If children came with instruction manuals, there would be a “may cause drowsiness” or “don’t operate heavy machinery while parenting” sticker on the front cover.  

But we endure, we press on, our hearts full of boundless love.  Being a parent is a miracle, one that almost no one ever regrets.  But, there will be some challenges you must tackle and prepare yourself for, such as the lack of sleep and how having a child will literally change your life.

This is what parenting is all about!  It’s what you signed up for.  The problem is, despite all the stereotypes, the jokes, and what the baby books tell you about parenting, it’s a safe bet you’re about to run into a few surprises along the way.  

Here are a few of those surprises you might’ve suspected, but maybe never thought about:

1) Sleep will be difficult. 

Gone are the days of sleeping in on Saturday morning.  Gone are the days of waking up completely rested and ready to tackle the day.  This isn’t meant to scare you, but something really interesting happens once you become a parent.

Your parental instincts kick-in.  Even when you think you might have a moment to rest, that instinct will wake you up and keep you going.  Maybe it’s an urge to check on the little one.  You might even think you hear them crying and want to check on them, especially at first when they’re the most vulnerable.  

As they get older, it’s time for a whole new ballgame.  Can you imagine what toddlers are up to in the middle of the night?  Screaming if they’re having a nightmare, when they need a drink of water, or to use the bathroom.  It’s a free-for-all and one night is as unique and challenging as the next.  Even when they’re teenagers you’ll have sleepless nights, especially as they experience a lot of ‘firsts’, like first sleepover, first time borrowing the car, and their first date.

These are all natural thoughts and emotions you’ll have as a parent and they’ll never stop.  You’ll never stop worrying about their safety and well-being.  If you don’t hear from them after a certain amount of time, you might be inclined to think the worst.  Take it in stride and hopefully you’ll have plenty of help to get through it.  As they say, it takes a village…

2) Every day will be a new journey.  

Do you remember what it was like when you were young, careless, and free?  You had no responsibilities, had your holidays off, got to spend time with your friends whenever you wanted.  

Then, you got older.  Responsibilities started to set in.  Maybe your parents made you get a job during the holidays.  Everyone else got to relax and enjoy their break, but you had to work, go to school, and start handling your own bills.  

You see, once you become a parent, it’s that feeling ALL the time, except you don’t get a day off.  Maybe you can get grandma to come over for a few hours, but you’re literally on-guard 24/7.  As discussed above, you lose sleep.  You’re up early.  You’re feeding them, changing them, playing with them, rocking them, and soothing them.  

Once you think it’s all good, you’ll have to start the list over.  Then there’s laundry, cooking, cleaning, et cetera.  It doesn’t matter if you’re sick and tired, this is your job now and it doesn’t end.  Yes, it’ll be exhausting, but it does get easier.  Just like anything in life, you get used to the grind and it’s totally worth it in the end.

3) You might long for some adult stimulation.

You love your little munchkin.  They can be funny, honest, adorable, and even inspirational.  But the truth is, you’re an adult!  You are stimulated by adult conversations.  You enjoy shows that challenge you intellectually and leave you on the edge of your seat.  But get ready for what may potentially be an IQ-dropping change.

Little kids are relentless.  If they want your attention, they will get it.  They will sit in your lap and scream, “Mum. Hey mum. Mum? Mummy? Hey, mummy? MUM? MUMMY?” until you answer.  They’ll make you watch Dora the Explorer over and over and over again.  And don’t even think about turning the radio onto your favorite station while on the road.  

It can become brain-numbing and repetitive.  Be prepared for demanding answers, requesting, whining, tantrums, and a lot of busyness that doesn’t slow down.  A great way to counteract this is to find another mum just like you.  Not only will you get that stimulating conversation and advice from someone your age, your little one has a friend to burn up that extra energy with.

4) Don’t forget your spouse!

Whether you’re married, engaged, or have been dating a long time, the thought that persists is how kids can make a couple closer, but that’s not true in a lot of ways.  One of the toughest parts of raising children is the obvious stress it will put on your relationship.  It’s known that intimacy can dwindle, you’re both exhausted, and won’t be able to get out and go on dates like you used to.  

Therefore, it’s important to find ways to keep that spark going no matter how challenging raising children can get.  Remember, mum and dad are the cornerstone of the whole family.  You will have to sacrifice some things for the sake of raising your children, but your marriage/relationship isn’t one of them.  Make it a priority to spend time with your partner.  It will have a larger impact on your kids than you may realize.  

Parenting can be one of the most exhausting, challenging, and demanding jobs ever, but it’s also the most rewarding, amazing, and fantastic things you will ever accomplish in your life.  A child isn’t a weekend hobby, but a precious life that looks up to you to meet his or her needs.  And the secret you must know about parenting is no one knows what they’re doing.  They take it one day at a time and learn as they go.  

How To Safeguard Your Child From Falls

Children of all ages are prone to falling over. When first starting to walk, toddlers are unbalanced and unsure of their footing. In their teenage years, rapid growth spurts make for awkwardness. Between, stray laces and a lack of fear make for some spectacular tumbles.

Children develop quickly. One day they can hardly crawl, the next they are climbing up the lounge furniture as if they were Edmund Hillary or Sherpa Tenzing conquering Everest. It’s this rapid evolution of their skills that makes it so difficult to keep falls and bumps to a minimum. Perhaps the best we can do is stop falls from causing serious injury.

The home as an adventure playground

One of the most enjoyable things we do with our children is take them to a park or playground and let them play on the swings and slides. We encourage them to run and leap from one stepping stone to another, climb up ropes, and develop their muscles. Then we wonder why they use our furniture as their own indoor adventure playground!

Actually, it’s not all our fault. As soon as they can crawl, babies have a natural urge to get as high as they can, or move as quickly as they can to explore their surroundings further. When a child falls, how badly they are injured will depend upon:

  • How far they fall
  • What they fall onto
  • Obstructions they hit on the way down

Hard surfaces… um… hurt. Sharp table corners hurt too, and can cut, while a fall from 2 or 3 metres is more dangerous than a fall from a couple of feet.

Making your home a safe and ‘soft’ adventure playground

Young children are going to climb and run no matter what you do, so the best strategy to employ is to watch and understand how your child is developing and plan a safe home environment:

  • When a child is a baby, keep them safe by constant supervision and controlling their movement. If changing on a bed or changing table, keep a baby safe by keeping your hand on him or her even when you turn away.
  • As the baby grows into the toddler years, starts to crawl and then takes those first tentative steps, make sure that all furniture is sturdy and steady and can’t be pulled over.
  • Keep a safety gate on stairs to stop a crawling baby from climbing up and falling down
  • Keep all children’s toys at low levels that are easily accessible without climbing.
  • Move sharp edges away from areas where you child plays, or is likely to fall and bump into them.

Your young child is going to be curious, especially if he or she thinks they are ‘missing out’. Children who are put to bed while a garden party is going on are likely to climb up at the window. If it’s open, you risk them falling out. Move chairs away from windows and keep windows locked at all times. And if you have a balcony where you child plays, never leave them unattended.

A few tips for all

It’s not only children that are prone to falls. We adults fall over, too. Especially if:

  • Spillages haven’t been mopped up and floors are left slippery
  • Children’s toys litter the lounge room floor and stairs
  • Rugs on shiny floors don’t have anti-skid mats underneath

If your child falls over, the likelihood is that no serious damage will be done. But always err on the side of caution. It’s best to be safe than sorry.

A Burning Problem Easily Solved

One of the most agonising injuries that can be suffered is a burn. In a 2009/10 study in Australia and New Zealand, it was found that the most at risk of injury by burning are male toddlers between the age of one and two. Scalding is the most common form of burn injury (Ensure you keep that bath water at the right temperature).
How to eliminate the possibility of burns

Unfortunately, try as you might, there is no way to completely eliminate the possibility of burning. But you can reduce the risk massively:

  • Always keep your eye open for danger and make sure you supervise your child at all times
  • Reinforce the danger areas in your home by gently telling your child to stay away
  • Keep electrical wires and cables out of reach of children
  • Make the kitchen a no-go area when you’re cooking and never leave boiling pots and pans unattended
  • Don’t use electric blankets in children’s rooms and turn off any heaters at night (or keep them at a very low temperature)
  • In living rooms, install heater guards and make sure all toys and playpens are at least 1 metre away from heaters

Forget ‘don’t drink and drive’; don’t drink and cuddle!

Okay, we don’t really mean that you don’t need to worry about drinking and driving – of course, you should never mix the two. But the same can be said of drinking a tea or coffee while you have a youngster in your arms or on your lap: don’t do it!

If you have an open fire or other naked flame (for example, candles or gas burners), never let children be near them without supervision – and don’t take your eye away from them, not even for a second.

Similar precautions should be taken outdoors. The family barbecue – where there is likely to be burning coals, patio heaters, blow torches, gas lighters, and so on – is one of the most dangerous events held by the Australian family. Always have a bucket of cold water on hand, supervise the children at all times, and know what to do should an accidental burn be suffered.

The Menace of Medicines in the Home

Here in Australia we tend to associate poisoning with jellyfish stings, snakes, and spiders. But there’s something way more dangerous – and potentially deadly – lurking in the average household cupboard: medicines. Children are most at risk from accidental poisoning in the home, and those under 5 are in the highest risk category.

How do you know if your child has been poisoned in the home?

Young children love exploring, and one of the ways that toddlers learn about their environment is by putting things in their mouths. If a child could (or would) tell you that he or she has swallowed something they shouldn’t have, it would make a parent or carer’s job a whole lot easier. But they don’t, do they? So knowing a few of the tell-tale signs of poisoning is essential. These symptoms include:

  • Feeling sick or vomiting
  • Stomach pains, and possibly diarrhoea
  • Drowsiness or dizziness
  • General weakness
  • Shivering or sweating
  • Headaches
  • Irritability
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Rash (or perhaps burns around the mouth)
  • Seizures

That’s a long list of symptoms, and if you do suspect that your child has been poisoned by medicines you should try to establish which medicine is to blame and get medical help immediately.

Prevention is better than cure

Though little hands and enquiring minds mean almost nowhere is safe in the house, there are some precautions you should take with your medicines:

  • Keep all medicines in a locked cupboard out of the reach of children
  • Never take your tablets and other medicines out of their containers, and make sure the lid is secured always
  • Keep bags out of children’s reach. This is especially important when you have visitors: a woman’s bag is a favourite place to keep medicine, and a target for toddlers
  • When visiting friends and relatives, keep an eye on your toddler at all times

Avoid Bath Time Danger and Keep Your Child Safe

Baby bath with foam washesBath time is one of the happiest moments with a baby. A few minutes of fun and baby giggles, never mind the cuddles afterwards. Unhappily, the bath is one of the most dangerous places for your baby, toddler, or young child. Every bath time brings two main dangers: drowning and scalding.

Before bath time

Rule one to make sure bath time is a happy time is to be prepared. Get the towel and face washer, soap and hair shampoo ready. Make sure that you have a clean nappy and a change of clothes on hand.

When you run the water, always run the cold water first and check the temperature is between 37 and 38 degrees Celsius.

During bath time

Never leave your child alone in the bath, and always stay close – no more than an arm’s length away.

There are plenty of distractions that could pull you away from where you should be − a knock at the door or the telephone ringing, for example. Ignore them all.

As a habit,  a safe practice could be to turn your mobile phone off  before you take your child into the bathroom to avoid distractions.

After bath time

Once bath time is finished, let the water out. In fact, pull the plug out of the bath as soon as you lift your child from the water. It’s the only safe way. It’s easy to forget the water is still in the bath, and even the smallest of crawlers will be tempted back into the water while you’re not around.

One final thing…

Every year, an average of five children under the age of five will drown in the bath in Australia. Another 47 will spend time in hospital because of a near-drowning in the bathtub (Department of Health and Ageing). Hundreds more are scalded by bathwater that is too hot. Taking the simple precautions above will ensure your baby or young child does not join these numbers. And if – Heaven forbid – the worst should happen, make sure you know what emergency action to take for burns and scalding and for drowning.